Download free eBooks of classic literature, books and novels at Planet eBook. Subscribe to our free eBooks blog and email newsletter. By George Orwell . book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Alternate cover edition of ASIN BJTHWKUFor previous cover edition see. Nineteen Eighty-Four, often published as , is a dystopian novel by English writer George Orwell published in . The introduction to the Penguin Books Modern Classics edition of Nineteen Eighty-Four reports that Orwell originally set the.

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    1984 George Orwell Book

    Written in , was George Orwell's chilling prophecy about the future. your mind with these extraordinary science fiction and fantasy books. by George Orwell, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Renowned urban artist Shepard Fairey's new look for Orwell's classic dystopian tale. One of Britain's most popular novels, George Orwell's.

    The party controls what people read, speak, say and do with the threat that if they disobey, they will be sent to the dreaded Room as a looming punishment. Orwell effectively explores the themes of mass media control, government surveillance, totalitarianism and how a dictator can manipulate and control history, thoughts, and lives in such a way that no one can escape it. The protagonist, Winston Smith, begins a subtle rebellion against the party by keeping a diary of his secret thoughts, which is a deadly thoughtcrime. With his lover Julia, he begins a foreordained fight for freedom and justice, in a world where no one else appears to see, or dislike, the oppression the protagonist opposes. Perhaps the most powerful, effective and frightening notion of is that the complete control of an entire nation under a totalitarian state is perfectly possible. If the world fell under the control of one or even multiple dictators, the future could easily become a twisted, cruel world where every movement, word and breath is scrutinised by an omnipotent, omnipresent power that no one can stop, or even oppose without the fear of death. It highlights the importance of resisting mass control and oppression. War is Peace. Freedom is Slavery. Ignorance is Strength. Topics Children's books. Children and teenagers Teen books George Orwell Dystopian fiction children and teens children's user reviews.

    Winston roused himself and sat up straighter. He let out a belch. The gin was rising from his stomach. His eyes refocused on the page.

    He discovered that while he sat helplessly musing he had also been writing, as though by automatic action. And it was no longer the same cramped aw k- ward handwriting as before. His pen had slid voluptuously over the smooth paper, printing in large neat capitals—.

    He could not help feeling a twinge of panic. It was absurd, since the writing of those particular words was not more dan- gerous than the initial act of opening the diary; but for a mo- ment he was tempted to tear out the spoiled pages and abandon the enterprise altogether. But he did not do so, however, because he knew that it was useless.

    Whether he went on with the diary, or whether he did not go on with it, made no difference. The Thought Police would get him just the same.

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    He had committed—would still have committed, even if he had never set pen to paper—the essential crime that contained all others in itself. Thoughtcrime , they called it. Thoughtcrime was not a thing that could be concealed forever. You might dodge successfully for a while, even for years, but sooner or later they were bound to get you.

    It was always at night—the arrests invariably happened at night. The sudden jerk out of sleep, the rough hand shaking your shoulder, the lights glaring in your eyes, the ring of hard faces round the bed. In the vast majority of cases there was no trial, no report of the arrest. People simply disappeared, always during the night. Your name was removed from the reg- isters, every record of everything you had ever done was wiped out, your one-time existence was denied and then forgotten.

    You were abolished, annihilated: He sat back in his chair, slightly ashamed of himself, and laid down his pen. There was a knocking at his door. He sat as still as a mouse, in the futile hope that whoever it was might go away after a single attempt.

    But no, the knocking was repeated. The worst thing of all would be to delay.

    His heart was thumping like a drum, but his face, from long habit, was probably expressionless. He got up and moved heavily toward the door. As he put his hand to the doorknob Winston saw that he had left the diary open on the table.

    It was an inconceivably stupid thing to have done. But, he realized, even in his panic he had not wanted to smudge the creamy paper by shutting the book while the ink was wet. He drew in his breath and opened the door. Instantly a warm wave of relief flowed through him. A colorless, crushed-looking woman, with wispy hair and a lined face, was standing outside. Do you think you could come across and have a look at our kitchen sink?

    It was Mrs. Parsons, the wife of a neighbor on the same floor. She was a woman of about thirty, but looking much older. One had the impression that there was dust in the creases of her face. Winston followed her down the passage.

    These amateur repair jobs were an almost daily irritation. Victory Mansions were old flats, built in or thereabouts, and were falling to pieces.

    The plaster flaked constantly from ceilings and walls, the pipes burst in every hard frost, the roof leaked whenever there was snow, the heating system was usually running at half steam when it was not closed down altogether from motives of economy. Repairs, except what you could do for yourself, had to be sanctioned by remote committees which were liable to hold up even the mending of a window pane for two years. Everything had a battered, trampled-on look, as though the place had just been visited by some large violent animal.

    Games impedimenta—hockey sticks, boxing gloves, a burst football, a pair of sweaty shorts turned inside out—lay all over the floor, and on the table there was a litter of dirty dishes and dog-eared exercise books. On the walls were scarlet banners of the Youth League and the Spies, and a full-sized poster of Big Brother. There was the usual boiled- cabbage smell, common to the whole building, but it was shot through by a sharper reek of sweat, which—one knew this at the first sniff, though it was hard to say how—was the sweat of some person not present at the moment.

    In another room someone with a comb and a piece of toilet paper was trying to keep tune with the military music which was still issuing from the telescreen.

    Parsons, casting a half- apprehensive glance at the door. She had a habit of breaking off her sentences in the middle. The kitchen sink was full nearly to the brim with filthy gr e e n- ish water which smelt worse than ever of cabbage. Winston knelt down and examined the angle-joint of the pipe. He hated using his hands, and he hated bending down, which was always liable to start him coughing. Parsons looked on helplessly.

    He was a fattish but active man of paralyzing stupidity, a mass of imbecile enthusiasms—one of those completely un- questioning, devoted drudges on whom, more even than on the Thought Police, the stability of the Party depended. At thirty-five he had just been unwillingly evicted from the Youth League, and before graduating into the Youth League he had managed to stay on in the Spies for a year beyond the statutory age.

    At the Ministry he was employed in some subordinate post for which intelligence was not required, but on the other hand he was a leading figure on the Sports Committee and all the other committees engaged in organizing community hikes, spontaneous demonstrations, saving campaigns, and voluntary activities generally. He would inform you with quiet pride, between whiffs of his pipe, that he had put in an appearance at the Community Center every evening for the past four years. An overpowering smell of sweat, a sort of unconscious testimony to the strenuousness of his life, followed him about wherever he went, and even remained behind him after he had gone.

    Parsons, immediately becoming invertebrate. There was a trampling of boots and another blast on the comb as the children charged into the living room. Par- sons brought the spanner. Winston let out the water and dis- gustedly removed the clot of human hair that had blocked up the pipe. He cleaned his fingers as best he could in the cold water from the tap and went back into the other room. A handsome, tough-looking boy of nine had popped up from behind the table and was menacing him with a toy auto- matic pistol, while his small sister, about two years younger, made the same gesture with a fragment of wood.

    Both of them were dressed in the blue shorts, gray shirts, and red necker- chiefs which were the uniform of the Spies. It was a good job it was not a real pistol he was holding, Winston thought. In the better light of the living room he noticed with interest that there actually was dust in the creases of her face. Want to see the hanging! Some Eurasian prisoners, guilty of war crimes, were to be hanged in the Park that evening, Winston remembered.

    This happened about once a month, and was a popular spectacle. Children always clamored to be taken to see it. He took his leave of Mrs. Parsons and made for the door. But he had not gone six steps down the passage when something hit the back of his neck an agonizingly painful blow.

    It was as though a red-hot wire had been jabbed into him. He spun round just in time to see Mrs. Parsons dragging her son back into the door- way while the boy pocketed a catapult. The music from the telescreen had stopped. Instead, a clipped military voice was reading out, with a sort of brutal relish, a description of the armaments of the new Floating Fortress which had just been anchored between Iceland and the Faroe Islands.

    With those children, he thought, that wretched woman must lead a life of terror. Another year, two years, and they would be watching her night and day for symptoms of unorthodoxy.

    Nearly all children nowadays were horrible. What was worst of all was that by means of such organizations as the Spies they were systematically turned into ungovernable little sav- ages, and yet this produced in them no tendency whatever to rebel against the discipline of the Party. On the contrary, they adored the Party and everything connected with it.

    All their ferocity was turned outwards, against the enemies of the State, against foreigners, traitors, saboteurs, thought-criminals.

    It was almost normal for people over thirty to be frightened of their own children. The sting of the catapult bullet had worn off. Years ago—how long was it?

    Seven years it must be—he had dreamed that he was walking through a pitch-dark room. And someone sitting to one side of him had said as he passed: He had walked on without pausing. What was curious was that at the time, in the dream, the words had not made much impression on him. It was only later and by degrees that they had seemed to take on significance.

    by George Orwell – review | Children's books | The Guardian

    But at any rate the identification existed. Nor did it even seem to matter greatly. There was a link of understanding be- tween them more important than affection or partisanship.

    Winston did not know what it meant, only that in some way or another it would come true. The voice from the telescreen paused. A trumpet call, clear and beautiful, floated into the stagnant air. The voice continued raspingly:.

    Your attention, please! A newsflash has this mo- ment arrived from the Malabar front. Our forces in South India have won a glorious victory. I am authorized to say that the action we are now reporting may well bring the war within measurable distance of its end. Bad news coming, thought Winston. And sure enough, following on a gory description of the annihilation of a Eurasian army, with stupendous figures of killed and prisoners, came the announcement that, as from next week, the chocolate ration would be reduced from thirty grams to twenty.

    Winston belched again. The gin was wearing off, leaving a deflated feeling. However, in his present position he was invisible. Winston walked over to the window, keeping his back to the telescreen. The day was still cold and clear. Somewhere far away a rocket bomb exploded with a dull, reverberating roar. About twenty or thirty of them a week were falling on London at present. Ing- soc. The sacred principles of Ingsoc. Newspeak, doublethink, the mutability of the past. He felt as though he were wandering in the forests of the sea bottom, lost in a monstrous world where he himself was the monster.

    He was alone. The past was dead, the future was unimaginable. What certainty had he that a single human creature now living was on his side? And what way of knowing that the dominion of the Party would not endure forever?

    Like an answer, the three slogans on the white face of the Ministry of Truth came back at him:. He took a twenty-five-cent piece out of his pocket.

    There, too, in tiny clear lettering, the same slogans were inscribed, and on the other face of the coin the head of Big Brother. Even from the coin the eyes pursued you. On coins, on stamps, on the covers of books, on banners, on posters, and on the wrapping of a cigarette packet—everywhere.

    Always the eyes watching you and the voice enveloping you. Asleep or awake, working or eating, indoors or out of doors, in the bath or in bed—no escape. Nothing was your own except the few cubic centime- ters inside your skull. The sun had shifted round, and the myriad windows of the Ministry of Truth, with the light no longer shining on them, looked grim as the loopholes of a fortress. His heart quailed before the enormous pyramidal shape. It was too strong, it could not be stormed.

    A thousand rocket bombs would not batter it down. He wondered again for whom he was writing the diary. For the future, for the past—for an age that might be imaginary.

    And in front of him there lay not death but annihilation. The diary would be reduced to ashes and himself to vapor. Only the Thought Police would read what he had written, before they wiped it out of existence and out of memory. How could you make appeal to the future when not a trace of you, not even an anonymous word scribbled on a piece of paper, could physically survive? The telescreen struck fourteen. He must leave in ten minutes. He had to be back at work by fourteen-thirty. Curiously, the chiming of the hour seemed to have put new heart into him.

    He was a lonely ghost uttering a truth that nobody would ever hear. But so long as he uttered it, in some ob- scure way the continuity was not broken. It was not by making yourself heard but by staying sane that you carried on the human heritage. He went back to the table, dipped his pen, and wrote:.

    To the future or to the past, to a time when thought is free, when men are different from one another and do not live alone—to a time when truth exists and what is done cannot be undone: From the age of uniformity, from the age of solitude, from the age of Big Brother, from the age of double- think—greetings! He was already dead, he reflected.

    It seemed to him that it was only now, when he had begun to be able to formulate his thoughts, that he had taken the decisive step. The consequences of every act are included in the act itself. He wrote:. Now that he had recognized himself as a dead man it be- came important to stay alive as long as possible. Two fingers of his right hand were inkstained.

    It was exactly the kind of detail that might betray you. Some nosing zealot in the Ministry a woman, probably; someone like the little sandy-haired woman or the dark-haired girl from the Fiction Department might start wondering why he had been writing during the lunch interval, why he had used an old-fashioned pen, what he had been writing—and then drop a hint in the appropriate quarter.

    He went to the bathroom and carefully scrubbed the ink away with the gritty dark-brown soap which rasped your skin like sandpaper and was therefore well adapted for this purpose. He put the diary away in the drawer. It was quite useless to think of hiding it, but he could at least make sure whether or not its existence had been discovered. A hair laid across the page-ends was too obvious. With the tip of his finger he picked up an identifiable grain of whitish dust and deposited it on the corner of the cover, where it was bound to be shaken off if the book was moved.

    For an account of its structure and etymology, see Appendix. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

    And while has come and gone, his dystopian vision of a government that will do anything to control the narrative is timelier than ever It was their final, most essential command. With each lie he writes, Winston grows to hate the Party that seeks power for its own sake and persecutes those who dare to commit thoughtcrimes.

    No one can deny the influence of this novel, its hold on the imaginations of multiple generations of readers, or the resiliency of its admonitions—a legacy that seems only to grow with the passage of time.

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    Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Brave New World. Aldous Huxley. Animal Farm. George Orwell. Mass Market Paperback. Animal Farm [Mar 01, ] Orwell, George. Lord of the Flies. William Golding. Read more. ONE It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen. From where Winston stood it was just possible to read, picked out on its white face in elegant lettering, the three slogans of the Party: In small clumsy letters he wrote: His small but childish handwriting straggled up and down the page, shedding first its capital letters and finally even its full stops: It had happened that morning at the Ministry, if anything so nebulous could be said to happen.

    Then the face of Big Brother faded away again, and instead the three slogans of the Party stood out in bold capitals: For a moment he was seized by a kind of hysteria. He began writing in a hurried untidy scrawl: II As he put his hand to the doorknob Winston saw that he had left the diary open on the table. Parsons vaguely. The voice continued raspingly: Like an answer, the three slogans on the white face of the Ministry of Truth came back at him: He went back to the table, dipped his pen, and wrote: He wrote: Thoughtcrime does not entail death: Product details Mass Market Paperback: Signet Classic January 1, Language: English ISBN Start reading on your Kindle in under a minute.

    Don't have a Kindle? Try the Kindle edition and experience these great reading features: Book Series. Literary Fiction.

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    Is this feature helpful? Thank you for your feedback. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. Customer images. See all customer images. Read reviews that mention big brother george orwell van halen high school winston smith animal farm thought police hot for teacher brave new required reading thought provoking ministry of truth david lee science fiction lee roth nineteen eighty-four new world highly recommend war is peace soviet union.

    Showing of 7, reviews. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Hardcover Verified download. This is one of the first books I have read more than once. I first read "" in and now for the second time in The book has remained the same, but both the world and I have not.

    I cannot begin to convey how genuinely frightening this book is. I am a lover of popular science fiction and am astounded by Orwell's ability to be more compelling, entertaining and engrossing than authors with the benefit of light sabers, phasers and teleportation. To every young person who has been assigned this book, know that you are reading a literary work of art. Many of you will understand and appreciate it, but if you love literature, please make a mental note to read this again when you are older.

    Youth brings with it eternal hope, boundless optimism and of course, hormones, so you will find yourself rebelling against the pessimism of the book itself - you will effectively be Winston raging against the machine, hoping, searching, questing for a way out. In short, you will cheat. But when you get older, have a family, lose loved ones and see some of your dreams unfulfilled - when you witness entire nations and races of peoples born, live and die in brutal squalor - when you reflect on the technological advances made over the decades and gaze, with mouth agape, at how a people can be less advanced, less informed and less enlightened, not despite these innovations, but BECAUSE of them, then you will read as it was meant to be read Mass Market Paperback Verified download.

    As expected, Big Brother catches Winston, and tortures him ruthlessly until he is a shell of his former self. I wanted to rape you and then murder you afterwards. Regardless of whether or not the characters are relatable, the book definitely serves as a cautionary tail to all those who have scanned it pages. This book has many horrifying elements and scenes, such as telescreens, the things constantly watching people even in their own homes.

    This turned Winston into what seemed like an animal with rabies, and after this punishment in which he was spared death because he betrayed his lover Julia he was never the same. Phones like the iPhone not only have fingerprints for touch identification but now are starting to delve into the world of facial recognition, and no one truly knows for sure where this information goes.

    We see far worse things than Winston saw in the Ministry of Love by simply turning on the news. Nations like North Korea have complete control over their citizens, and the saddest part is, these citizens are too shielded from reality to even know that there is something wrong with the way they are treated. People also have the tendency to blindly trust whatever the media says, which could just be another way us people are manipulated every day.

    Check out "It Can't Happen Here. Kindle Edition Verified download. I read this in high school I'm 72 now and at that time it was a prediction of things to come.

    In some ways it's pretty close. It is interesting that people are reading it more now because of the current situation. I think that if they are alarmed by this book they should try "It Can't Happen Here.

    I first read for a high school English class almost 20 years ago, I was immediately drawn to Orwell's writing style. For every bit of dialog, there is MUCH more narration, but the narration is engrossing and intriguing. If you're like me and love a good bleak novel that explores the basic depravity of man other favorites of mine are Brave New World and Lord of the Flies , read Don't forget to give Animal Farm a try as well; it covers very similar themes using talking barnyard animals, but it's an easier read.

    In the 's I first read this book. It has been a guiding reminder through these years of how fragile freedom and democracy can be and of how important it is to be vigilant and aware of trends that may destroy them!

    1984 by George Orwell – review

    See all 7, reviews. He also suspects that his superior, an Inner Party official named O'Brien , is a secret agent for an enigmatic underground resistance movement known as the Brotherhood, a group formed by Big Brother's reviled political rival Emmanuel Goldstein. The next day, Julia secretly hands Winston a note confessing her love for him, which simply reads, "I love you. Winston realises that she shares his loathing of the Party.

    They first meet in the country, and later in a rented room above Mr. Charrington's shop. During his affair with Julia, Winston remembers the disappearance of his family during the civil war of the s and his terse relationship with his ex-wife Katharine. Winston also interacts with his colleague Syme, who is writing a dictionary for a revised version of the English language called Newspeak. After Syme admits that the true purpose of Newspeak is to reduce the capacity of human thought, Winston speculates that Syme will disappear.

    Not long after, Syme disappears and no one acknowledges his absence. They arrange a meeting at O'Brien's luxurious flat where both Winston and Julia swear allegiance to the Brotherhood. Winston and Julia read parts of the book, which explains more about how the Party maintains power, the true meanings of its slogans and the concept of perpetual war. It argues that the Party can be overthrown if "proles" proletarians rise up against it. Charrington is revealed to be an agent of the Thought Police.

    Winston and Julia are captured in the shop and imprisoned in the Ministry of Love. O'Brien reveals that he is actually loyal to the Party, and was simply part of a special sting operation to catch "thoughtcriminals".

    O'Brien openly admits that the Party "is not interested in the good of others; it is interested solely in power. When he asks Winston if there is anything worse that can happen, Winston points out that the Party has not managed to make him betray Julia. O'Brien then takes Winston to Room for the final stage of re-education. The room contains each prisoner's worst fear, in Winston's case, rats. As a wire cage holding hungry rats is fitted onto his face, Winston shouts "Do it to Julia!

    After being released, Winston meets Julia in a park. She says that she was also tortured, and both reveal betraying the other. Winston realises that he and Julia no longer feel for one another and that the Party has managed to take away their love, too. O'Brien has a servant named Martin. They confessed to treasonable conspiracies with foreign powers and were then executed in the political purges of the s.

    Later, in the course of his editorial work, Winston sees newspaper evidence contradicting their confessions, but drops it into a memory hole.

    Eleven years later, he is confronted with the same photograph during his interrogation. Ampleforth is a dreamer and intellectual who takes pleasure in his work, and respects poetry and language, traits which cause him disfavour with the Party. Despite disliking sexual intercourse, Katharine married Winston because it was their "duty to the Party".

    Although she was a "goodthinkful" ideologue, they separated because the couple could not conceive children. Divorce is not permitted, but couples who cannot have children may live separately. For much of the story Winston lives in vague hope that Katharine may die or could be "got rid of" so that he may marry Julia. He regrets not having killed her by pushing her over the edge of a quarry when he had the chance many years previously. He is socially active and participates in the Party activities for his social class.

    He is friendly towards Smith, and despite his political conformity punishes his bullying son for firing a catapult at Winston.

    Later, as a prisoner, Winston sees Parsons is in the Ministry of Love, as his daughter had reported him to the Thought Police, hearing him speak against Big Brother in his sleep. Even this does not dampen his belief in the Party, and he states he could do "good work" in the hard labour camps. He was a lexicographer who helped develop the language and the dictionary of Newspeak. Although he is enthusiastic about his work and support for the Party, Winston notes that "He is too intelligent.

    He sees too clearly and speaks too plainly. Goldstein is the symbolic enemy of the state —the national nemesis who ideologically unites the people of Oceania with the Party, especially during the Two Minutes Hate and other fearmongering.

    World in novel[ edit ] Main article: Ingsoc Ingsoc English Socialism is the predominant ideology and pseudophilosophy of Oceania, and Newspeak is the official language of official documents. Orwell depicts the Party's ideology as an oligarchical worldview that "rejects and vilifies every principle for which the Socialist movement originally stood, and it does so in the name of Socialism.

    The ministries' names are the opposite doublethink of their true functions: "The Ministry of Peace concerns itself with war, the Ministry of Truth with lies, the Ministry of Love with torture and the Ministry of Plenty with starvation. Ever since the end of the nineteenth century, the problem of what to do with the surplus of consumption goods has been latent in industrial society. At present, when few human beings even have enough to eat, this problem is obviously not urgent, and it might not have become so, even if no artificial processes of destruction had been at work.

    Ministry of Plenty[ edit ] The Ministry of Plenty rations and controls food, goods, and domestic production; every fiscal quarter, it publishes false claims of having raised the standard of living, when it has, in fact, reduced rations, availability, and production.

    The Ministry of Truth substantiates the Ministry of Plenty's claims by revising historical records to report numbers supporting the current, "increased rations". Ministry of Truth[ edit ] The Ministry of Truth controls information: news, entertainment, education, and the arts.